Shoreham

Shoreham

Strung in a row of three connected pavilions, the Shoreham beach house enjoys uninterrupted and extensive views of Westernport Bay whilst creating outdoor areas sheltered from the elements.

The brief called for a response not only to its site, but the need to provide zoned living and bedroom areas. Additionally, the extensive use of stone gives a feeling of permanency and a natural affinity with the homes location.

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Portsea House

Portsea House

A couple needed a weekend retreat that would capture 180 degree views across Port Phillip Bay to Point Nepean National Park and comfortably accommodate their extended family over weekends and summer holidays.

Timber and stone help create a warm and relaxed building that nestles in to its undulating, tea treed landscape.

The project balances Rescode requirements for front setback which preserves neighbourhood character and protect neighbours’ bay views, with the clients’ desire for a tennis court and pool to the rear.

Flexible spaces accommodate large family gatherings and close off to more intimate pods for quieter cosy weekends for two. Axes through the building delineate shared and private zones and ensure views continue throughout the house.

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Lambeth Avenue

Lambeth Avenue

Lambeth House provides a growing family with more space and greater amenity, while preserving and celebrating the heritage of their original home. The rear boundary of the site is defined by a stunning original red brick tramways wall. The scale of the wall gives the design an established and inspiring backdrop to the architecture.

Upon entry, the eye is drawn down the period hallway to a framed view of the garden and boundary wall. Original features have been maintained in the existing front of the house when the new living zones are located to the rear, taking advantage of the northern sunlight and external areas.

The emphasis was on maximizing natural light within flexible spaces which could be utilised by a growing family. The spaces can be easily divided into smaller purposeful zones or opened to create a feeling of larger flowing rooms.

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Glassford Street Residence

Glassford Street Residence

A Melbourne family wanted to extend a heritage residence to accommodate the changing family needs.

The clients brief was primarily to transform the back half of the house, with a cold and tired 1980’s extension, darkened by tall cypress trees. Also important was preserving the period features of the original Edwardian house. The distinction between old and new is now clear and complementary.

Reconfiguring the main living areas and adding a first floor was balanced with Rescode requirements for respecting neighbourhood character. Our aim was to open up and enliven the internal spaces, bringing light in and creating glimpses of the garden integral to the design.

A north facing family room now connects to the smartly landscaped rear garden. Upstairs, the teenager’s retreat doubles as a fluid and expansive guest zone. Sliding doors create private nooks or disappear to open the space.

The physical and metaphorical heart of the house is an intimate, warmly coloured wine room, reflecting the owners’ passion. Expanding from the centre, materials such as the natural Chalford limestone flooring help create a relaxed, warm-in-winter, cool-in-summer building that adjusts with the changing seasons.

A delight to design and build, the carpenter exceeded his role in crafting this home.

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Hawksburn

Hawksburn

The two storey property sits in the heart of leafy Hawksburn streets. The existing house is one of two grand Victorian terraces. The design is to create an extension that plays with shape and form to embrace the northern light and garden.

Garton

Garton

Typical of much of inner Melbourne’s Federation housing stock, this semi detached dwelling, is wedged into a tight site, heavily shaded by a double storey brick wall on its northern boundary.

Space to entertain large extended family gatherings was a priority for the owner. Flexible accommodation for out of town guests was also important.

Capturing sunlight into the reconfigured spaces was a challenge, considering the orientation. A light well and courtyard, carved into the northern side of the house, provide natural light and ventilation to all downstairs areas. Reflective and more decorative materials bring light and energy to these small outdoor spaces. The light green glazed brickwork and handmade green terracotta pavers reflect the solidity and craftsmanship from the original Federation house.

An upper storey bedroom recedes back from the street, dark in colour and leaning into the imposing brick boundary wall, it’s raked form an extension of the neighbouring pitched roofline.

Balconies from the upper level of the house and also the studio at the rear of the block look into the internal garden. Enclosed and screened by vertical louvres, they frame views of large neighbouring Eucalyptus treetops against the sky.

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Claremont

Claremont

A small ensuite was to be added to a generous Edwardian californian bungalow. Not wanting to add a contrasting box to the side of their house, the clients chose, instead, to match materials and style. We designed a small addition that uses the same terracotta roof tiles, and painted brick. To avoid a miniature cookie cutter version of the existing house, we used a pitched roof but scaled it in such a way the the pitch matches the original in all elevations. It blends in to the Federation roof, yet has an individual more modern form of its own.

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